Unique Wedding Customs From Across the Globe

Perhaps you want to incorporate a tradition from your homeland, or your parents’ or grandparents’, into your wedding ceremony.  Maybe the two of you have done some globetrotting and want to acknowledge the adventures you have had.  Or, perhaps you just want to add some international flair to your wedding day. We’re here to share with you a few unique wedding traditions from around the world.

Courtesy Beverly Demafiles Photography

Courtesy Beverly Demafiles Photography

A custom in Japan is San San Kudo, which dates back to the 1600s.  San San Kudo translates to “three three nine times”, where the couple takes three sips each from three special ceremonial sake cups stacked on top of each other. This comes to a total of nine sips, and nine is considered the luckiest number in Japanese culture. In a slight variation on this, the couple can share the ceremony with their parents by having them also take sips - symbolizing the bond between the two families.

In Australia, couples often choose to feature a unity bowl as part of their wedding ceremony.  For the unity bowl, each wedding guest is given a stone and asked to hold it during the ceremony.  As the guests exit, they place their stone in the bowl. The newlyweds then have the unity bowl and stones to remind them of the support and presence of their friends and family as they embark on their new life together.

Sweden takes a different approach to your walk down the aisle.  Rather than having the bride’s father her down the aisle, the bride and groom walk arm in arm down the aisle together as their first steps toward their new life journey together.

The French offer a unique alternative to the traditional wedding cake - a croquembouche.  In place of a cake, this is a tower of cream-filled pastry puffs topped with a sweet glaze and often decorated with fruit and nuts.  A croquembouche can make an impressive centerpiece to wow your guests.

There are many Celtic traditions that can be incorporated into your wedding day.  In days past, it was common for an Irish bride to have a small horseshoe sewn into the hem of her wedding dress for good luck. In borrowing that custom for today, consider tying a ribbon with a lucky horseshoe charm to your bouquet. A Scottish groom may not only wear a kilt but also will place a sprig of white heather in his buttonhole for good luck.  One other Celtic ritual you may want to include is handfasting.  Prior to exchanging vows, the couple joins hands together as the officiant ties their crossed wrists together with a ribbon or scarf to signify the two of you coming together as one.

Ma Maison provides its own international flair for your wedding with our European inspired elegance. Along with the many choices you have for traditions to include in your wedding plans, Ma Maison offers a variety of options for where to host your ceremony.  From our reclaimed French antique gazebo to our grand hall, featuring exposed wooden beams and beautiful crystal chandeliers, you’ll find the perfect site for your special day.